National Geographic

National Geographic

@natgeo

Life is an adventure - enjoy the ride and the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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photo by @daviddoubilet BFFs in a night sea. A juvenile jack is a hitchhiker seeking protective cover in the soft tentacles of a jellyfish in a deep channel off Moalboal Philippines. We were diving at night using a large suspended light array to attract creatures from the depths 3000 feet below. The shy jack and jelly pair appeared at the edge of light for a brief moment before turning back for the deep. The sea in the middle of the night is an alien universe, many creatures rising from the depths only under cover of darkness to feed. Drifting in the current in this dark world is like diving in a sea of stars. On @natgeo assignment inside the Coral Triangle, Philippines with @JenniferHayesig. ocean jellyfish bff dream night philippines coraltriangle for moreocean followme @daviddoubilet

16 Minutes ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @christian_foto ( Christian Rodríguez ) A young girl of the ethnic group Hmong Black working at rice terraces. They seed rice together with several families of the "Lao Chai" village, Lao Cai province, Vietnam. Photo: @christian_foto / @prime_collective rice hmong vietnam

31 Minutes ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) with words by @m_synnott (Mark Synnott) - Every sport has an unsung hero, some quiet badass that operates under the radar, pushing the boundaries of their chosen field of endeavor without giving a whit if anyone knows about it—or cares. Matt Oliphant, pictured here (unpublished photo), is just such an individual. Matt served as Robbie's photo assistant/rigger/schlepper/safety guy on the Dark Star assignment. And I'm embarrassed that we've made it this far down the road without calling out the massive contribution he made to the overall success of the project. When things got gnarly down in Dark Star, in other words, shortly after I stepped into the mouth of the cave, I turned to Matt and said, “Hey man, can you keep an eye on me, and make sure I get out of this cave alive?” Matt just chuckled and said, “You got it man.” Matt’s not one to boast, but over the course of three weeks we spent together in Uzbekistan, including at least one session sitting on a rock in base camp drinking scotch, he shared enough stories for me to wonder: who the heck is this guy? During one particularly harrowing tale, involving some horrendously deep cave in Mexico, I held up my hand for him to stop. “Wait a second,” I said. “Are you a famous caver?” “No, no, no,” replied Matt. “Nope, that’s not me.” Then he proceeded to rattle off a bunch of names of people that he considers to be the real icons of the sport. The thing is, I could swear I'd heard those same names in many of the stories Matt had been telling me. If you're a caver, you probably already know about Matt. If you're not, let me introduce you to my hero. And, in case you’re wondering: no, I won't be going underground again unless Matt is by my side. soulbrother darkstar myhero

3 Hours ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @amivitale. Mealtime for the elephants at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary ( @r.e.s.c.u.e) in Nothen Kenya with wildlife keepes Mike, Joseph, Naomi and May. They wee ecuited fom the Namunyak Wildlife Consevancy aea and have been especially successful at etuning lost elephant calves to thei family heds. Reteti is the fist community owned and managed sanctuay in Afica and the culmination of a two-decade shift towads community-diven consevation. Potecting animals fo, and not just fom, people is ceating new economies and conseving the full ecosystem. Please follow all of us, @amivitale, @r.e.s.c.u.e and @sararacamp to support and learn more about these initiatives. @nrt_kenya @lewa_wildlife @ConservationOrg @tusk_org @kenyawildlifeservice @sandiegozoo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety elephants saveelephants retetielephants stoppoaching kenya northernkenya magicalkenya whyilovekenya africa everydayafrica natureisspeaking photojournalism amivitale

5 Hours ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Video by @jtkerby | This gelada monkey mother is holding an infant that is only minutes old. Full photo sequence of its birth on my profile @jtkerby | Prior to photographing this story, I worked as a biologist in the Ethiopian Highlands. On this day, that training paid off when I noticed a female monkey acting oddly - she walked away from the herd on her own, not something adult females will often do. I had been following an Ethiopian wolf with fellow photographer @tbfrost, but quickly decided to figure out what this monkey was up to instead. It soon became apparent that she wasn't sick or hurt as I initially feared, but was about to give birth. I put on my telephoto lens, gave her some space, and watched her silently bring a new infant into the chilly alpine air. This video captures her moments after giving birth, just before a cool rain began to fall as she rejoined the herd. For more on geladas and the Guassa Community Conservation Area, check out @jtkerby and the full story in the April issue of NatGeo with additional photos by @tbfrost and text by @craigwelch. Ethiopia ExpeditionsCouncil Gelada Guassa GGRP

7 Hours ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @martinschoeller Martin: "I love that hat." Larry: "That's my son's" M: "Pretty stylin'. Where are you from?" L: "Cincinnati, Ohio." M: "My wife is from Cleveland." L: "Oh, just up the road, that's nice." M: "Yeah. I don't mind Ohio. Everybody makes fun of it, but it's really pretty in the summer." L: "That's right." M: "You've been on the street for a while?" L: "About three months." M: "What happened?" L: "Well, what happened...my story is I was working as a nurse and what happened was I was afflicted with cancer. And it gets up to my kidneys. So at that point I had to drop everything I was doing. I'm on a machine Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. 5am in the morning for three hours, 'till 8:30am. And I get a needle in the stomach twice a week." M: "You don't need an operation or chemotherapy?" L: "This is chemo. It's a needle form. But this type of cancer is not extensive. You know what I mean?" M: "It won't spread?" L: "Yeah. They hit it before it got worse." M: "And then the chemo. Does it make you sick?" L: "No, no. I'm up and ready to go. I drink a cup of coffee and call it a day." M: "You're living and feeling good?" L: "Always. That's the key, right?" M: "How long did you work as a nurse?" L: "For twenty-one years." M: "Did you like it?" L: "I loved it. I liked the people, doing what I can, sharing, giving the little love that I can give, encouraging people to feel better and go forth, you can do better in your life and make it better, you know what I mean? Just live." For more portraits and stories, follow me: @martinschoeller

8 Hours ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photograph by @PaulNicklen taken while on assignment for @natgeo in Antarctica // When penguin chicks head to sea for the first time, they are incredibly vulnerable as they lack the swimming skills of their parents. Leopard seals know they are weak and time their own migratory patterns to coincide with this mass exodus of chicks going to sea from the penguin colony. These Adelie chicks found themselves a moment of reprieve by hopping onto an iceberg. Then, it came down to a waiting game. As a bystander it is gut-wrenching to watch the drama unfold. The leopard seals need to eat and yet you hope for the penguins to make it out of ‘leopard seal alley’. To see the hard reality of a leopard seal eating a penguin, please followme on @paulnicklen // With @sea_legacy @natgeopristineseas @cristinamittermeier @ladzinski @andy_mann @craigwelch rhythmsofnature hardreality nature naturelovers instagood love picoftheday photooftheday adventure

10 Hours ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Image by @joelsartore | Three-month-old endangered red panda twins at the @LincolnChildrensZoo in Nebraska. Red pandas clean their fur in the mornings by licking their paws and then rubbing their fur with them, much like a cat would. They rub the parts they can’t reach, like their back, on rocks or trees. These animals are very temperature sensitive. When it’s hot out they often hang out on tree branches, dangling their limbs. When it gets cold they warm themselves by covering their faces with their huge, fluffy tails. If scared or threatened, red pandas first attempt to flee. If they can’t get away, they stand up on their hind legs, try to make themselves look larger, and use their sharp claws as defense. We’re happy to announce the release of our children’s photo/poetry book “Animal Ark” featuring images of over 100 species photographed by @joelsartore for the Photo Ark project and poetry by @kwamealexander. Through this book we learn how each of us, no matter how big or small, is important, miraculous, and vital to this planet. To see an image of a nine-week-old clouded leopard cub which is featured alongside these red pandas in our new children’s book, check out @joelsartore! . . babyanimals redpanda cuteanimals photoark animalark animalfacts natgeo

12 Hours ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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14 Hours ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Comment from National Geographic:


Video of sequenced photographs by @simonnorfolkstudio Avalanches are common in Afghanistan’s mountainous areas in winter, and rescue efforts are frequently hampered by a lack of equipment. Each year, this year no exception, the beautiful, pristine blanket of white holds within it the possibilities of destruction and death. Here another sequence of images from Bamyan Province in Afghanistan’s Central Highlands transitioning through seasons. From a frozen early spring through to the snows of winter, documenting the stages of flooding, irrigation, planting and harvest. Follow @simonnorfolkstudio for updates, outtakes, unpublished and archive material. Music: Ay Sholae Hazeen Desolate Flame used with permission. @instituteartist @michaelhoppengallery @benrubi_gallery @galleryluisotti @natgeo @thephotosociety afghanistan bamyan bamiyanlandscape photojournalism documentaryphotography simonnorfolkstudio simonnorfolk documentary reportage timelapse winter spring summer seasons prixpictet changingseasons snow video stratographs stratograph timetaken videooftheday landscape disasterseason

15 Hours ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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my frame-a kodiak brown bear through the rangefinder the academy of natural sciences of drexel university, philadelphia, USA by David Chancellor @chancellordavid The Kodiak brown bear is the largest of the Alaskan brown bears. Its varied diet follows the season, for example, it grazes on plants in the summer and eats salmon and berries during the late summer to fall. Brown bears are a subgroup of the grizzly bear, but they are now only found in Alaska and isolated regions of northern Canada. They are rarely found in the lower 48 US states, but were once found as far south as Mexico and as far west as the Sierra Mountains. Brown bears are often said to be unpredictable, but attacks on humans are rare. The few reported attacks that there are, however, are made by injured bears or females protecting or separated from their cubs. Brown bears are generally solitary creatures with no natural predators. To see more of my work and projects for @natgeo follow me here , and @chancellordavid diorama kodiakisland kodiakbear conserving hunting conservation academyofnaturalsciencesatdrexel @artfuldodgersimaging @hellokiosk @francescamaffeogallery mamiya7ii @filmsnotdead bears @natgeo @chancellordavid

16 Hours ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photograph by @thomaspeschak Charles Darwin called marine iguanas 'Imps of Darkness' and was not a fan of these, as he called them 'disgusting and clumsy' lizards. I on the other hand became completely smitten with these underwater algae munching Godzilla impersonators. They quickly became my favorite underwater photo subject. Dependent exclusively on cold water marine algae, increases in sea temperature have detrimental effects on marine iguana populations. If temperatures continuo to warm, these Galapagos icons could become the first to disappear. Shot on assignment for @natgeo magazine for a forthcoming story on Climate Change and the Galápagos Islands. In collaboration with @darwinfound galapagosnationalpark @pelayosalinas and @ecuadortravel For more images you can follow photographer @thomaspeschak

16 Hours ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @CristinaMittermeier. During a dive under the freezing waters of the Antarctic Peninsula, we came upon a tragic sight. A giant graveyard of blue whale skeletons; remnants of the slaughter that occurred here over 100 years ago. Complete skeletons of these giant whales still lie untouched in the bottom of the sea. Pre-whaling, there may have been more than 250,000 blue whales in the world. But relentlessly pursued by 20th century whaling fleets, the species was nearly exterminated before receiving worldwide protection in 1967. They are starting to recover in some parts of the world but remain absent from Antarctica. A reminder of how fragile, our marine ecosystems are. OnAssignment for @NatGeo. With @NatGeoPristineSeas, @paulnicklen, @andy_mann, @Ladzinski, @craigwelch. * * * To see images from this assignment, followme at @CristinaMittermeier banwhaling stopclimatechange nature respectnature underwater whale ocean PhotographersforAntarctica MPA CCAMLR2018

18 Hours ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @lynseyaddario | A women draws water from a well in a village in the state of Maharastra, in India. Indian women often spend a large portion of their day fetching water for drinking, cooking, bathing, and latrines in their homes. Many spend hours daily walking back and forth to the nearest wells - which can be miles away, across difficult terrain. - Sponsored by @StellaArtois. Water is a fundamental human need, yet 663 million people around the world today live without access to safe water. Find out how to purchase a Stella Artois limited-edition Chalice and help end the global water crisis at natgeo.com/. Join Stella Artois and @water to learn more about how you can help be the generation to end the global crisis. 1Chalice5Years

1 Days ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @randyolson | Ogallala aquifer water mining for agriculture has left families outside Clovis, New Mexico, completely dry. Buffy Berdoza's family has been carrying water in 5-gallon buckets in the back of their pickup for four years. There are 88,000 agricultural wells just across the state line in Texas that now average around 200 gallons a minute. Originally, these wells pulled around 1000 gallons a minute out of the aquifer but have depleted it to the point that some wells can barely fill a cow tank. Buffy's daughter, Jasmine (in photo above), quit her job and came home to to carry water when Buffy had health issues. Jasmine makes multiple trips to Clovis to haul water every day in twenty one 5-gallon plastic buckets in the back of a small pickup truck. - Sponsored by @StellaArtois. Water is a fundamental human need, yet 663 million people around the world today live without access to safe water. Find out how to purchase a Stella Artois limited-edition Chalice and help end the global water crisis at natgeo.com/. Join Stella Artois and @water to learn more about how you can help be the generation to end the global crisis. 1Chalice5Years

1 Days ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @randyolson | There are times when fetching water can kill you. The tribes in the Omo River valley fight over access to water and the food they can grow on its riverbanks. There are droughts where locals have to dig into riverbanks to get bits of muddy water. And recently there’s the additional threat of the Gibe III dam, which could completely choke the Omo. When the dam goes online and the river is diminished, these groups will not have the water and food they need. These are the last culturally diverse tribes in southern Ethiopia with attributes like lip-plates, bull jumping, and stick fighting. The fear is that when the Omo diminishes, Lake Turkana will dry up like the Aral Sea, which was one of the planet’s greatest environmental disasters. - Sponsored by @StellaArtois. Water is a fundamental human need, yet 663 million people around the world today live without access to safe water. Find out how to purchase a Stella Artois limited-edition Chalice and help end the global water crisis at natgeo.com/. Join Stella Artois and @water to learn more about how you can help be the generation to end the global crisis. 1Chalice5Years

1 Days ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @andreabruce | A woman gets water from a well near her home in Khost, Afghanistan. Women spend nearly half their day fetching water from wells for their families and animals. - Sponsored by @StellaArtois. Water is a fundamental human need, yet 663 million people around the world today live without access to safe water. Find out how to purchase a Stella Artois limited-edition Chalice and help end the global water crisis at natgeo.com/. Join Stella Artois and @water to learn more about how you can help be the generation to end the global crisis. 1Chalice5Years

1 Days ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @ljohnphoto | On the side of the only highway in Konso, Ethiopia, is a frequent gathering of women “scratching” for water from the sand of the once full Aroyo River. The women complain the sand dam stopped the underground flow they depend on for daily water supply but soon they will have clean and dependable water at a pump nearby. But for now it’s scratching and filling jerry cans, cup by cup. - Sponsored by @StellaArtois. Water is a fundamental human need, yet 663 million people around the world today live without access to safe water. Find out how to purchase a Stella Artois limited-edition Chalice and help end the global water crisis at natgeo.com/. Join Stella Artois and @water to learn more about how you can help be the generation to end the global crisis. 1Chalice5Years

1 Days ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @ljohnphoto | Without water we die. “We know when we are created that this will be our life,” says Gale Deyknto, as she bends to hoist a Gerry can of water weighing 80 pounds onto her back. To find water she may have to walk 2 hours or 2 days, up and down mountainsides, across deserts, risking attack by men who do not want her water but her body. The women in Kenya share this fate with females all over the developing world. Females are the water carriers, and because of that they are at risk for injury, disease and attack. Whether water is pulled up hand over hand from a “singing well” dug into the Kenyan earth or “scratched” from a Tanzanian riverbed, it is precious. On occasion, a miracle happens. A well is dug. A water line is stretched from one village to another. And with that abundance, villagers begin simple, life-saving acts—washing their hands, growing better food, and gaining an education. - Sponsored by @StellaArtois. Water is a fundamental human need, yet 663 million people around the world today live without access to safe water. Find out how to purchase a Stella Artois limited-edition Chalice and help end the global water crisis at natgeo.com/. Join Stella Artois and @water to learn more about how you can help be the generation to end the global crisis. 1Chalice5Years

1 Days ago
natgeo

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @amytoensing | I climbed up a hill above the apple orchard in the dark, hoping morning would bring something special to photograph for a story I was working on about pollinators for @natgeo. Every spring farmers rent hundreds of honeybee hives holding millions of bees to provide the vital task of pollinating their apple trees. This dance of nature marks a cycle of beauty and rebirth, but it is also essential to humans. One out of every three bites of the food we eat depends on pollinators. As dawn broke, the fog rolled through the flowering apple orchards below and I knew I had the image I was looking for. - On NationalAgDay, we ThankaFarmer for growing our food with only 0.7% of the water on Earth. And for finding new ways to solve the world’s water crisis. Test your water knowledge at nationalgeographic.com/unchartedwaters. Sponsored by @WinFieldUnited. In partnership with @sustain_ag and @landolakesinc.

2 Days ago